Self-Hosted Vs. Hosted WordPress

WordPress Background

WordPress is the number one content management system in the world today, used by over 60 million people. WordPress began in 2003 as a blogging platform but has since evolved into a full-blown content management system that is used for both blogging and business websites. WordPress is an Open Source project, with hundreds of developers all over the world constantly working on the platform. There are thousands of plug-ins, widgets, and themes that can be easily added to enhance a WordPress site.  Best of all, WordPress is absolutely free to use without ever having to pay a license fee. From the smallest personal blogs to Fortune 500 business sites, it can be produced in WordPress.

WordPress is both user-friendly for the beginner and flexible enough for the most advanced web developers. Beginners can drag and drop widgets, use themes, and do everything to start up a site or blog without having to write a line of code. At the same time, developers of all skill levels can easily access the code at any time. This means that your modest, beginning site can evolve into an enterprise site without having to change platforms.

What is Self-Hosted WordPress?

There are two forms of WordPress: hosted and self-hosted. Hosted WordPress sites reside on WordPress.com servers.  You cannot track your stats with Google Analyitcs or other tracking code. Your options to customize the look of your site are extremely limited: no CSS or PHP modifications are allowed. Not only are you restricted from placing your own ads or affiliate links on your site, your site will display ads from WordPress.com. As the saying goes, “you can’t get something for nothing”. Unless you are just starting a blog about your cat or something, skip the free (hosted) version of WordPress and get your own self-hosted WordPress website.

Most people who are going to take the time to put together a website or blog need to OWN their content and domain name. With a self-hosted WordPress site YOU OWN your unique domain name, YOU OWN your site’s content, and any ads displayed are chosen by you (and YOU collect the revenue). Even if you aren’t planning to start your website or blog with the intention of making money from it, you may quickly find that people like what you are writing and start coming to your site in big numbers. If you have a self-hosted WordPress site, you can place some ads on your site and collect the revenue. With a free (hosted) WordPress.com site, your great content cannot generate any revenue for you.

How Do I Start A Self-Hosted WordPress Site?

The main page of our website, wpsetupsteps.com, guides you through this process. Believe it or not, it only takes a few minutes to go from nothing to having your own domain name and WordPress blog or website live and online. The entire process can be completed by following our simple, one-page guide. Detailed information about any particular step in the process is also available.

We recommend a hosting company, Bluehost, that offers low-priced plans for WordPress beginners. You can get a domain name free for the first year with your web hosting plan purchase. So, take a minute and check out our guide on the main page of this site. You may be surprised at how affordable it is to start your own website. And owning your own site and domain name really is the only way to go.

Comments

  1. Dervin33 says:

    I had a WordPress.com blog for awhile. But I got tired of not being able to do ANYTHING to the CSS – very minimal formatting options for the hosted version. Switched to the self-hosted version and haven’t looked back! Love it!

  2. WordPress is best when self hosted. Why should I give my advertising revenune away? I’m the one creating the content. At lest I can put my own AdSense on a self-hosted site and get paid for it.

  3. BestBlogger says:

    Why would anyone use wordpress.com for a serious website? I can’t believe that. Self-hosted is the only way to make any money from your website. Or you’re just giving money away. Nothing is “free”.

  4. John L says:

    Not all hosts are the same. Make sure you get unlimited domains and email accounts for a single account.

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